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what is the difference b/w horizontal and vertical tracebility ...can u pls give with examples

 

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Traceability matrix is of three types:

 

1. Vertical Traceability matrix.

2. Transversal Traceability Matrix

3. Horizontal Traceability matrix.

 

Vertical Traceability matrix is high level document which map the
requirements to all phases of the Software development cycle. i.e. Unit testing
Component Integration testing System Integration testing Smoke/Sanity testing
System Testing Acceptance testing...etc.

 

Vertical traceability is related to the bidirectional trace that could be
registered from the textual requirements going through graphical functional
requirements and at last to the phases of the software development lifecycle
like: design coding testing and so on.

 

Transversal traceability is related to the bidirectional trace that could be
registered from the textual requirements through the graphical non-functional
requirements the architectural policies and in the end to the architectural
mechanisms (architectural decisions).

 

Horizontal Traceability matrix is used for Coverage analysis when a
requirement changed it will used to identify the Test cases prepared on that
requirement. Horizontal traceability is related to the bidirectional trace that
could be registered from the graphical non-functional requirements or even the
architectural policies or mechanisms to the architectural integration model and
at last the design phase.

  
 
 

In the Requirements Management (REQM) process area, specific practice 1.4 states, "Maintain bidirectional traceability among the requirements and the project plans and work products." Bidirectional traceability primarily applies to vertical traceability and at a minimum needs to be implemented both forward and backward (i.e., from requirements to end products and from end product back to requirements).

Vertical traceability identifies the origin of items (e.g., customer needs) and follows these same items as they travel through the hierarchy of the Work Breakdown Structure to the project teams and eventually to the customer. When the requirements are managed well, traceability can be established from the source requirement to its lower level requirements and from the lower level requirements back to their source. Such bidirectional traceability helps determine that all source requirements have been completely addressed and that all lower level requirements can be traced to a valid source.

Horizontal traceability is also important and is mentioned in subpractice 3, but it is not required to satisfy bidirectional traceability. Horizontal traceability identifies the relationships among related items across work groups or product components for the purpose of avoiding potential conflicts. It enables the project to anticipate potential problems (and mitigate or solve them) before integration testing. For example, horizontal traceability would follow related requirements across two work groups working on two associated components of a product. The traceability across these two work groups enables the work groups to see when and how a change in a requirement for one of the components may affect the other component. Thus, horizontal traceability enables the project to anticipate potential problems (and mitigate or solve them) before integration testing."

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